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International Vocal Coach Chuck Stewart teaching singing for 25 years

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ARTICULATION

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ARTICULATION FOR SINGING
 
Articulation is related to pronunciation and to enunciation.  There is a narrow band of acceptability between over-articulation and under-articulationThis varies from one style to anotherThere is an acceptable range of what is and what is not the norm in country music.  It is different in pop, R&B, jazz, Broadway, Classical styles, each one having its own professional stylistic standards.  One place to start looking at your own articulation would be consonants.  Consonants do not vary too much from one style to another, except for their clarity and emphasis.
 
Remember that what "works" in one style will be completely unacceptable or inadequate or over-done in another style.  Let's look at consonants used in singing.

CONSONANT TYPES:
 
ASPIRATED CONSONANTS
 
F as in friend
 
H as in hello

K as in kitchen

P as in pony

Q as in quack

S as in silly

T as in took

X as in box

CH as in chuck

SH as in shuck



PHONATED CONSONANTS
 
B as in boy

D as in dog

G as in girl

G as in the 2nd G in garage
(it is like a phonated sh)

J as in juggler

L as in luck

M as in man

N as in none

R as in roar

V as in victory

W as in world

X as in xylophone

Y as in yuck
 
Z as in zebra